Strategies, activity and evaluation that deliver Youth Social Impact.

With youth engagement finally being taken seriously in the boardroom this has brought increased scrutiny, evaluation, and a requirement to demonstrate impact.

This is not just the impact that activity is making on teens and young adults, but it’s the impact being made in a societal context within the wider community.

As new funding streams come online, and more organisations chasing ever-reducing pots of money – the emphasis will be on demonstrating past successes to secure future activity.

At Fourteen19® we support organisations to develop impactful youth strategies and deliver engaging communication strategies. We have also developed a youth social impact matrix that can be used to evaluate existing programmes and services for either the delivering organisation or its partners.

If you would like to talk ‘Youth Social Impact’ drop us a message in the webform below or call on 07890 483966.

Youth Strategy

I help organisations exceed their targets & objectives around engaging teens and young adults aged 14-25.

Read more

Youth Voice

Undertaking research with the target audience improves understanding and ensures that the strategy and activity is 'youth approved'.

Read more

Youth Activity

By ‘sanity checking’ ideas with young people all activity can deliver assurances that it is youth approved.

Read more

DESTINATION ADULTHOOD

Find out more about my book that was described as 'An essential life guide for every teen & young adult'

Read more

Our Work

What’s going on in the Fourteen19® universe:

Within increased financial pressures on the horizon, demonstrating impact needs to be much more than publishing a list of numbers in a board report.

Read more

Head of Agency Graham Sykes went back to his old university - Leeds Trinity - to deliver a talk on resilience.

Read more

It was during a conversation with a group of students in 2008 that I realised that my chosen career was no longer just a job but a crusade.

Read more

Could two less GCSE’s improve the life opportunities of young people? I think it could.

Read more